Bodleian Library Treasures. David Vaisey

Bodleian Library Treasures


Bodleian.Library.Treasures.pdf
ISBN: 9781851244775 | 240 pages | 6 Mb


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Bodleian Library Treasures David Vaisey
Publisher: Bodleian Library, University of Oxford



This Thai folding book is made of a paper made from the bark of the khoi tree, and is written in Pali, a language closely related to Sanskrit, and fairly close to the language the Buddha himself must have spoken. King John issued the Great Charter in 1215. Since its foundation in 1602, the Bodleian Library has acquired manuscripts, printed books, maps, music and ephemera in all languages, from all ages and corners of the globe. He conducted performances from this score, including the first (in Dublin, 13 April 1742). Attar's birds journey in search of a king, an allegory of text in Persian echoes Platonist thought on the connection between the soul and the divine intellect. The notes on these pages show Handel hastily adapting an aria in his most famous oratorio. This Treasure is paired with: Plato's Phaedo (On the soul). 'The Bodleian Library holds one of the great collections of maps in the world, andTreasures from the Map Room is a superb achievement in bringing together the library's greatest cartographic masterpieces in one beautifully illustrated and compellingly written book. Mary Wollstonecraft was a philosopher and feminist, and author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792). Mary Wollstonecraft; 19 August 1796; Letter. George Frideric Handel; 1741; Manuscript. This Treasure is paired with: Shelley's guitar (Making music). Manṭiq al-Ṭayr ʿAṭṭār; 1493; Manuscript. This Treasure isn't currently on display in the WestonLibrary. From this huge collection David Vaisey, former Bodley's Librarian and K. Her relationship with the radical philosopher William Godwin is brought to life through their letters. This Treasure is paired with: Fontaine's Le jeu des fables (Fables). Since its foundation in 1602, the Bodleian Library has acquired manuscripts, printed books, maps, music and ephemera in all languages, from all ages and from all corners of the globe. Two Bodleian treasures – the Book of Roger and a revised version of Ptolomy's Almagest in Arabic - were featured in the last episode of The Normans on BBC2 yesterday evening. It was re-issued in 1217, after John's death, in the name of his 10-year-old son, King Henry III.